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Patrick Brown

Photographer

Patrick Brown left Britain at the age of five, when his father's work took the family to the Middle East and Africa. Heavily influenced by images of war and urban strife, Brown was first drawn into documentary photography in Malawi, while recording the humanitarian work of a surgeon who once saved his life.


Moving to Thailand in 1999 brought Brown to a region undergoing rapid social, economical and environmental changes. For a photographer focusing on social issues, Asia provides a wealth of images on a variety of topics that deserve more attention and global awareness. Brown combines intense observation with a quiet, undemanding attitude towards his subjects.


"Patrick's images demand involvement and invite contemplation," says the Australian art curator Paola Anselmi. "A finely tuned sensibility to his subject matter creates a prefect balance; the photographer and his camera become almost imperceptible, without ever being either invasive or distant."


Brown's work regularly appears in Time, Newsweek, Stern, GEO, Der Spiegel magazine, Vanity Fair, Neon, The Guardian, Liberation, Human Rights Watch and UNICEF International, among others. His work has been shown at some of the prestigious festivals and galleries in the world, The ICP in New York, Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, Visa pour l'Image, in Perpiginan, Noorderlicht International Photofestival, Reportage Australia, Fotofreo Australia.


His work is in numerous international collections, including the City of Perth Photographic Collection, Holmes à Court Collection, World Press Photo Foundation, Ldymar Gallery, Stockholm and The Photography Gallery of Western Australia Collection. He has been a member of Panos Pictures since 2004.

Black Market by Patrick Brown

The sale of bear paws, crocodile hearts, and other rare animal parts form the world's third-largest illegal market. Black Market explores the human passions and ancient beliefs that drive the trade and threaten its most endangered species.